Speech in Noise workshop in Copenhagen

Wednesday 21 Jan 15

Contact

Jens Hjortkjær
Senior Researcher
DTU Health Tech
+4530 29 16 90

Contact

Tobias May
Assistant Professor
DTU Health Tech
+4545 25 39 59

Contact

Dorothea Wendt
Guest Senior Researcher
DTU Health Tech

About SpiN

SpiN workshop is organized each year by one European research group within the speech and hearing community. The meeting has so far provided a successful platform for young scientists to interact and discuss their work with experienced researchers in the field, resulting in fruitful exchanges of ideas and new research collaborations. Previous workshops were held in London (UK), Amsterdam (NL), Lyon (F), Cardiff (UK), Vitoria (ES), and Marseille (F), and were each attended by about 70 people, mainly from Europe, occasionally from North America. Next year the workshop will be organized Etienne Gaudrain from the University Medical Center Groningen. Read more about SpiN

On January 8 and 9, the 7th Speech in Noise Workshop (SpiN) was held in Kosmopol Copenhagen, organized by the Hearing Systems group in cooperation with Gaston Hilkhuysen. This year, the poster award was assigned to Jens Hjortkjær and his poster about “Single-trial EEG measures of attention to speech in a multi-talker scenario”.

The aim of the meeting once a year is to bring together young investigators and senior faculty from several European hearing-research groups to stimulate networking, discussion of research topics, and scientific collaboration in the field of speech and hearing research. More than 85 researchers (PhD students, postdocs, and principal investigators, as well as a keynote lecture) participated and contributed to the workshop. The workshop consists of two days of talks by invited speakers and contributed poster presentations.

Researchers from Hearing Systems (Tobias May, Johannes Zaar) as well as guest speakers from Universities and Institutions all over Europe such as Oldenburg University (Bernd Meyer), Aalto University (Emma Jokinen), Ben Gurion University of the Negev (Michael Jeffet), University Medical Center Groningen (Anita Wagner), VU Medical Center Amsterdam (Adriana Zekveld), Linköping University (Elaine Ng), Cochlear France/ORL CHU-Toulouse (Chris James), University of Geneva (Alexis Hervais-Adelman), University College London (Kurt Steinmetzger), Max Planck Institute (Malte Wöstmann) gave lectures on speech in noise.

The keynote talk was on "Predicting the intelligibility of connected speech and singing in adverse listening conditions" given by Sarah Hawkings from the University of Cambridge (UK). In her talk, she presented experiments on intelligibly of spoken and sung text and showed that linguistic predictability, ambient noise type and signal-to-noise-ratio, apply as much to singing as to spoken speech.

After a vote by the participants the Colin Cherry Award (named after the ‘inventor’ of the Cocktail Party Problem) was presented to Postdoc at Hearing Systems Jens Hjortkjær (left) by Organizer Gaston Hilkhuysen. The award was a cocktail kit. Photo by Alexandre Chabot-Leclerc.

"Our results suggest that we actually can track the attention of a listener in a cocktail party based on their brain activity"
Jens Hjortkjær

Beside oral presentations, the workshop included poster sessions on both days. On 30 posters the researchers presented their work focused on speech-related topics, such as speech intelligibility and quality in adverse conditions, computational models of speech perception, linguistic and cognitive aspects of speech communication, effects of hearing impairment on speech processing and speech perception of cochlear implant users. As every year, the best poster was awarded.
This year, the poster award was assigned to Jens Hjortkjær and his poster about “Single-trial EEG measures of attention to speech in a multi-talker scenario”. His work links to the new COCOHA project (Cognitive Control Of a Hearing Aid) about steering a hearing aid.
“It is a great honor to receive this Colin Cherry Award. Our results suggest that we actually can track the attention of a listener in a cocktail party based on their brain activity. And we can do this in real-time,“ Jens Hjortkjær said with a smile.

Read more about the Cocktail Party Problem here

Read more about Jens Hjortkjær's project
here